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Sashiko, Boro and Kantha

sashiko quilt

On Sunday 13 March we have our first Sashiko workshop – we are very, very excited! Eloise and I did a taster class with Sophia van Tongeren  at Leiden Textile Festival and we were hooked! And we knew that this was a class that we wanted to host at Cross and Woods.

So upcycling is not new.

Sashiko embroidery is a very old form of hand sewing using simple running stitches. The Japanese word Sashiko means “little stabs“. It  was born out of necessity to conserve and repair garments at a time when cloth was not widely available to farmers and fishermen. Sashiko has been considered as functional embroidery or a form of decorative reinforcement stitching to repair points of wear or tears with patches.

Sashiko is usually made with white thread on indigo fabric, but traditions are there to be broken, so at C&W we have lots of bright colours

sashiko threads

The thread on the indigo is sewn using a long needle with lots of stitches on the needle at once making it one of the most relaxing things that i have ever done.

This is an example how a Sashiko quilt can look – totally amazing!

sashiko quilt

Boro is very close to Sashiko, both use white thread on indigo and  both are mending techniques but boro, meaning “rags” or “tattered cloth,” refers to textiles that have been patched many times, so giving a far less structured effect. Boro gives a new lease of live to something that you think you could throw away – a kimono is patched where it is worn, this then wears out further but with boro it gets a new lease of life maybe as a blanket for a baby and so on until it becomes a beautifully repaired cleaning cloth!

boro-kimono

Kantha is a similar technique but originates Eastern South Asa. It is a form of embroidery often practised by rural women. The traditional form of Kantha embroidery was done with soft dhotis and saris, with a simple running stitch along the edges putting worn out and old items together and creating something new!

Kantha

So upcycling is not new!!

Come and join us for the workshop and learn more about these amazing techniques!

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Sashiko, Boro and Kantha

On Sunday 13 March we have our first Sashiko workshop – we are very, very excited! Eloise and I did a taster class with Sophia van Tongeren  at Leiden Textile Festival and we were hooked! And we knew that this was a class that we wanted to host at Cross and Woods.

So upcycling is not new.

Sashiko embroidery is a very old form of hand sewing using simple running stitches. The Japanese word Sashiko means “little stabs“. It  was born out of necessity to conserve and repair garments at a time when cloth was not widely available to farmers and fishermen. Sashiko has been considered as functional embroidery or a form of decorative reinforcement stitching to repair points of wear or tears with patches.

Sashiko is usually made with white thread on indigo fabric, but traditions are there to be broken, so at C&W we have lots of bright colours

sashiko threads

The thread on the indigo is sewn using a long needle with lots of stitches on the needle at once making it one of the most relaxing things that i have ever done.

This is an example how a Sashiko quilt can look – totally amazing!

sashiko quilt

Boro is very close to Sashiko, both use white thread on indigo and  both are mending techniques but boro, meaning “rags” or “tattered cloth,” refers to textiles that have been patched many times, so giving a far less structured effect. Boro gives a new lease of live to something that you think you could throw away – a kimono is patched where it is worn, this then wears out further but with boro it gets a new lease of life maybe as a blanket for a baby and so on until it becomes a beautifully repaired cleaning cloth!

boro-kimono

Kantha is a similar technique but originates Eastern South Asa. It is a form of embroidery often practised by rural women. The traditional form of Kantha embroidery was done with soft dhotis and saris, with a simple running stitch along the edges putting worn out and old items together and creating something new!

Kantha

So upcycling is not new!!

Come and join us for the workshop and learn more about these amazing techniques!

Share this post
  ,


Leave a Reply

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